Click on the image above to view a short video about the professions CSASK regulates.

An audiologist has a minimum of a master’s degree (or equivalent) in their profession and have received clinical training and education in the following areas:

  • hearing loss and hearing aids/implantable devices/assistive technology;
  • dizziness and balance;
  • tinnitus;
  • noise and hearing loss prevention; and
  • disorders related to hearing systems.

In Saskatchewan, audiologists are healthcare professionals who must hold a valid licence to practise and to use the professional titles.

Audiologists prevent, identify, assess, (re)habilitate, and manage issues affecting hearing and balance. They work with individuals of all ages in various health and educational settings, including hospitals, public health units, community health centers, schools, private practices, industrial settings, and hearing aid manufacturers.

Audiologists in Saskatchewan are required to maintain their essential knowledge and skills in the profession to ensure they provide safe and ethical care.

Audiology services are available across the province in both the public and private sectors. Licensed professionals who have met the standards for practice in Saskatchewan are available to provide these services.

For more information about questions to ask private practitioners can be found here.

All audiologists who hold a valid licence in Saskatchewan are listed on the CSASK public directory. To verify the registration status of an audiologist, click here.

All audiologists must abide by the code of ethics. If you have concerns about the services provided by an audiologist, you may make a complaint here.

speech-language pathologist has a minimum of a master’s degree (or equivalent) in their profession and have received clinical training and education in the following areas:

  • speech;
  • voice and fluency;
  • language;
  • communication; and
  • swallowing.

In Saskatchewan, speech-language pathologists are healthcare professionals who must hold a valid licence to practise and to use the professional titles.

Speech-language pathologists prevent, identify, assess, (re)habilitate, and manage communication and swallowing disorders.  They work with individuals of all ages in various health and educational settings, including hospitals, public health units, community health centers, schools, and private practices.

Speech-language pathologists in Saskatchewan are required to maintain their essential knowledge and skills in the profession to ensure they provide safe and ethical care.

Speech-language pathology services are available across the province in both the public and private sectors. Licensed professionals who have met the standards for practice in Saskatchewan are available to provide these services.

For more information about questions to ask private practitioners can be found here.

All speech-language pathologists who hold a valid licence in Saskatchewan are listed on the CSASK public directory. To verify the registration status of a speech-language pathologist, click here.

All speech-language pathologists must abide by the code of ethics. If you have concerns about the services provided by a speech-language pathologist, you may make a complaint here.

  1. Once on the CSASK website 
  2. Click on the dark green “find an AUD or SLP” button at the top of your screen.
  3. When brought to the next screen, click on the box beside “Click here to find Private Practice services.”
  4. You may enter the name of the nearest city or town to you, and then click on the search icon (magnifying glass). Searching by this method will not separate the list into Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists.
  5. Alternatively, you may search by SLP or AUD and only listings for that profession will be shown. You can scroll through the list which shows the client demographic in which they work, then click on “view” to see the complete listing which will show the clinician’s areas of practice to find one who fits the needed criteria. If there are none in your area, you may need to find a clinician that provides service via telepractice.
  6. Though you cannot print a list from the portal, you may copy and paste listings into a document, which you can then print if desired.
  7. Many of our private practice clinicians have a waiting list as well, so you will likely have to contact several in order to make an appointment.